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Editorial


Nanobyte

Radhika A. Vaishnav
Research Director, Vadodara Stroke Center, Scientific Director, Natureka Life Sciences, Vadodara, Gujarat, India
Corresponding Author:

Radhika A. Vaishnav

Research Director, Vadodara Stroke Center, Scientific Director, Natureka Life Sciences, Vadodara, Gujarat, India
E-mail: radhikavaishnav@gmail.com

Corresponding Author:

Radhika A. Vaishnav

Research Director, Vadodara Stroke Center, Scientific Director, Natureka Life Sciences, Vadodara, Gujarat, India
E-mail: radhikavaishnav@gmail.com

DOI:10.18203/issn.2456-3994.IntJMolImmunoOncol20180465

ABSTRACT


Immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting PD-1/PD-L1 can have differing effects in various individuals. Recent studies published have suggested a role in the gut microbiome composition in contributing to the efficacy of these drugs. Patients who took antibiotics showed a poorer response to PD-1 inhibitors compared to those who did not take any antibiotics. In another study, fecal transplants to mice from patients that improved on PD-1 blockers showed improvement on the drugs, while mice receiving transplants from poor responders showed similar lack of efficacy of PD-1 blockers. New clinical trials and metagenomics studies are anticipated in the near future that could allow us to understand better the mechanisms of the gut microbial role in the effectiveness of immune checkpoint blockers.
Keywords: checkpoint, immune, glycolysis, glucose, metagenomics, gut flora

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