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Original Article


Genomic profiling of non-small cell lung cancer: A pilot study from South India

Linu A. JacobK.C. LakshmaiahK. GovindbabuD. LokanathaAnkit AgarwalAbhishek AnandSwapnil R. JaiswalVenkat AddalaShaleen Multani
Department of Medical Oncology, Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, KMIO Campus, Bengaluru, Karnataka1Positive Bioscience Ltd., 2Department of Biological Science, Sunandan Divatia School of Science, NMIMS University, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India, 
Corresponding Author:

Sahleen Multani

Department of Biological Science, Sunandan Divatia School of Science, NMIMS University, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
E-mail: shaleen.multani@gmail.com

Corresponding Author:

Sahleen Multani

Department of Biological Science, Sunandan Divatia School of Science, NMIMS University, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
E-mail: shaleen.multani@gmail.com

DOI:10.18203/issn.2456-3994.IntJMolImmunoOncol20172644

ABSTRACT


Introduction: Lung cancer accounts for the highest mortality globally, and there is a need to find new strategies and novel treatment options. Lung cancer is genetically heterogeneous across various ethnic populations, and therefore identifying the mutational landscape in Indian patients is important. Methods: The aim of the pilot study is to identify the prevalence and temporal sequence of molecular lesions in lung cancer patients from a regional cancer institute in South India using the circulating tumor DNA technique. Genotyping was performed on 26 newly diagnosed metastatic lung cancer patients using Illumina Omni Express Exome. Chip data were inspected using Genome Studio and subsequently exported for use with PLINK and further annotation was performed. Results: Seven genes including TP53 (61.5%), MUC16 (57.6%), KRAS (38.4%), STK11 (19.2%), Epidermal growth factor receptor (15.3%), ataxia telangiectasia mutated (15.3%), and nuclear factor-κβ (7.6%) demonstrated high incidence of mutations in patients. The other genes identified were observed in <5% of patients. Several types of mutations including missense, silent, nonsense, and frameshift mutations were observed in these genes. Conclusion: Integration of mutational profiling to identify gene mutations is required to facilitate personalized lung cancer therapy.
Keywords: Genomic profiling, Circulating tumor DNA, India, Lung cancer, mutation, Non-small cell lung cancer

Cited in 1 Document

  1. Kumar Prabhash, Suresh H. Advani, Ullas Batra, Bivas Biswas, Anuradha Chougule, Mithua Ghosh, Vamshi Krishna Muddu, T. P. Sahoo and Ashok K. Vaid (2019) Biomarkers in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers: Indian Consensus Guidelines for Molecular Testing. Adv Ther 36(4):766. doi: 10.1007/s12325-019-00903-y

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