Go Back This article was viewed 65 times

Editorial


Changing face of genomics in cancer medicine: Which “avatar” to treat?

Radhika A. Vaishnav
Harmony Clinic and Vadodara Stroke Center, Vadodara, Gujarat, India
Corresponding Author:

Radhika A. Vaishnav

Harmony Clinic and Vadodara Stroke Center, Vadodara, Gujarat, India
E-mail: radhikavaishnav@gmail.com

Corresponding Author:

Radhika A. Vaishnav

Harmony Clinic and Vadodara Stroke Center, Vadodara, Gujarat, India
E-mail: radhikavaishnav@gmail.com

DOI:10.18203/issn.2456-3994.IntJMolImmunoOncol20164381

ABSTRACT


As it stands today, genomic medicine is an example of translational medicine at its very best. A recent study reported by Morganella et al. described the sequencing of genomes of cells taken from over 500 breast cancers. The results suggest that the progression of a cell from healthy to tumor state involves multiple mutations, and they were able to cluster the breast cancers into different types based on their mutation “signatures” and their natural history of tumorigenesis. The single snapshot of a tumour may not be enough, however, as elegantly shown in a collaborative European study by Yates et al, who reported whole genome sequencing and targeted sequencing of multiple samples of breast tumour cells taken from each of 50 patients. These recent landmark studies help address clinical dilemmas such as subclonal genotypes that may be resistant to the chosen chemotherapy.
Keywords: Genomics, Cancer medicine, Mutation